Furniture Fit for an Outlander King

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getty
Photo taken by sass3journey.com illustrating the view from the upper courtyard.

The Getty Center, located in Los Angeles, is a unique destination that was a must see! The architecture of the museum is as unique as the exhibits held inside. Before entering the museum, I first had to explore the Central Garden.  It can be described as a natural, living work of art that incorporates over 500 plant varieties that constantly change with the seasons.  A must see!

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Central Garden lies in the heart of the Getty Center. The 134,000 square-foot design constantly changes with the seasons and as plants grow.

If you love the set designs of Outlander in Paris, like I do, this exhibit was a great opportunity to view real examples of royal Parisian furnishings from the 17th and 18th century.  Seeing this collection of Parisian furniture and decorative art pieces, enabled me to fully admire the level of detail the Outlander set and what the artistic design team went through, in order to bring their sets to life.

The exhibition I came to see held household furnishings and decorative pieces from the court of King Louis the XIV.  He was the great-grandfather of King Louis XV portrayed in our beloved Outlander series. The exhibit was nothing short of extraordinary! The intricate details and artistic design of each piece was truly unique.

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Ornate table used for many purposes, including writing. c18th century.
This luxurious table incorporates marquetry in the wood, marquetry in the iron, and tortouiseshell to create effects of leafy scrolls, garlands, and flowering vinesm c1680-90.
Originated from Paris this table incorporated marquetry in the wood, marquetry in the iron, and tortouiseshell to create effects of leafy scrolls, garlands, and flowering vines, c1680-90.
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Demonstration of an ornately paneled room, c1730-1755.

It was custom during the 1700’s for the walls of formal rooms in private Parisian houses to be fitted with carved and gilded wood panels.

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The intricate craftsmanship on this chandelier are best seen from the top and sides, indicating that it may have been hung in a stairwell where the viewer would have had opportunities to observe these details, c1710-1715.

Even the chandeliers were breathtaking in design, incorporating crystal drops to to aid in the reflection of light.  The cabinets also displayed incredible detail and were made by skillfully combining domestic and exotic woods, metal, shell, and other precious materials.  These were some of my favorite examples.

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J. Paul Getty Museum / www.getty.edu.  Designed by Andre Charles Boulle, a well known furniture maker of the period and the official cabinet-maker to King Louis XIV, c1675.
J. Paul Getty Museum / www.getty.edu. Cabinet, about 1750 - 1755, Oak veneered with bois satine, kingwood, and cherry; gilt bronze mounts.
J. Paul Getty Museum / www.getty.edu. Cabinet, about 1750 – 1755, Oak veneered with bois satine, kingwood, and cherry; gilt bronze mounts.

Finely decorated furnishings were uniquely designed to display success, wealth, and prosperity.  The clocks were no exception.

J. Paul Getty Museum / www.getty.edu. On the right is a wall clock decorated with a monkey playing in a tree with flowers, and a green dragon. These forms of clocks stuck the hour and 1/4 hour, to reduce need to light candles to refer to tell time, c1740.
J. Paul Getty Museum / www.getty.edu. This wall clock is decorated with a monkey playing in a tree with flowers and a green dragon. These forms of clocks stuck the hour and 1/4 hour, to reduce need to light candles to refer to tell time, c1740.
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A Turkish bed designed by Jean-Baptiste Tilliard for a private residence. Due to its large size it was often placed in an alcove with a draped canopy above (now missing), c1750-1760.

During the individualized tour of the exhibit, the guide stated that this type of furniture design was created for the purpose of being used as a bed or a couch for entertaining guests.

J. Paul Getty Museum / www.getty.edu
J. Paul Getty Museum / www.getty.edu. Compound Microscope and Case, about 1751. Made of gilt bronze, emanmal, shagreen and glass; wood, tooled leather, brass, velvel, silver galon and various natrual specimens.

The decorative microscope was one of my favorite finds! The Getty Center staff told me that it is still functional to this day. It reminded me of an example of what the microscopes may have looked like during Claire’s time. Truly a marvelous site!  You can revisit the passage where Claire was given the microscope in Diana Gabaldon’s fourth book of the series, entitled Drums of Autumn.

I stared for a moment at the disjointed tubes, screws, platforms and mirrors, until my minds eye shuffled them and presented me with the neatly assembled vision. “A microscope!”

“There’s more,” he pointed out, eager to show me.  “The front opens and there are wee drawers inside.”

In reference to why the gift was purchased, Claire asked “Why, then?”  The box was heavy; a gracious, substantial, satisfying weight across my legs, its wood a delight under my hands.  He turned his head to look full at me, then, his hair fire-struck with the setting sun, face dark in silhouette.

“Twenty-four years ago today, I married ye, Sassenach,” he said softly.  “I hope ye willna have cause yet to regret it.”

Drums of Autumn, page 136, Chapter 8, Man of Worth.

The Getty Center will continue to be one of my favorite destinations to visit while in Los Angeles.  I highly recommend a visit here if you have the opportunity; you never know what you may find.


All photos from our blogs are owned by Timeless Sass3nach Journeys, unless noted or attributed. The use of our photos is not permitted unless consent is given.

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